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Regaining Mobility: Joint Replacement Rehabilitation for Knee, Hip, and Shoulder

Joint Replacement Rehabilitation

Surgical joint replacement is a last resort to heal chronic pain and mobility issues after non-surgical treatments proved unsuccessful. It takes severe pre- and post-surgery joint replacement rehabilitation to restore your quality of life. Getting moving again is a crucial part of recovery. Physical therapy helps bring back your mobility and range of motion following joint replacement. 

What are the joint replacement surgery risks?

Joint replacement has the same risks as other surgeries such as infection and blood clot. More likely problems are stiffness, swelling, and range-of-motion issues. Active rehabilitation before and after surgery can reduce some risks.

Pre-operative Physical Therapy 

Completing pre-surgery exercises prepares the body for the upcoming operation and leads to shorter recovery times. A PT can determine advanced exercises for strength, endurance, flexibility, and balance. Support your joint by strengthening the surrounding muscles. Endurance training helps your body recuperate faster. Improved balance keeps you steady on your feet and reduces falls. 

Training your body is just part of the preparations. A skilled physical therapist can also provide education for the patient on what to expect following surgery. Your PT can teach you how to use assistive devices such as walkers and crutches and how to prepare your home to help you live as independently as possible. Recovery is safer and faster when you prepare ahead of time. 

Post-operative Joint Replacement Rehabilitation 

The physical therapist at the hospital will get the rehabilitation process started. At first, you’ll learn how to get out of bed and chairs safely. During the initial days following surgery, your physical therapy needs will focus on reducing pain and swelling. Your PT can show you how to use ice, compression, and elevation to control swelling around the affected joint. 

When you can move freely without pain, your physical therapy program can focus on returning to full function. Depending on the joint—knee, hip, or shoulder—your PT will design a specific recovery program including strength, balance, and mobility exercises. You will start range-of-motion exercises right off the bat. These restore movement to the joint so that you can perform activities of daily living. Still, you may need to use a cane or other assistive device for a while.

Joint Replacement Rehabilitation at COR

When you are recovering from joint replacement, the experienced physical therapists at Churchill Orthopedic Rehabilitation can provide techniques to reduce swelling and maximize comfort. Schedule a consultation to talk about your joint replacement rehabilitation needs. 

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