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How to Start Running: A PT’s Guide for Beginners

Running is an excellent exercise for maintaining health and wellbeing. Whether you have marathon ambitions or want to improve your health, knowing how to start running gets you on the right foot. Keep in mind that every runner is unique. We all have our own goals, skills, and fitness levels. So, be kind to yourself when just starting — don’t hold yourself to someone else’s standards. 

FAQ: How do I start running if I’m a new runner?

Consistency and planning are critical for new runners. When you decide to start, create a training plan you can stick with. Bear in mind that your body needs time to adjust to any new activity. So, build planned rest days into your schedule. Many people benefit from using a walk/run program that eases them into running. There are many pre-designed programs and apps that can help you start running. If you have any cardiac history, check with your primary care doctor and/or cardiologist to make sure that running is a safe exercise for you.

Training Frequency and Intensity 

When creating a personalized running regimen, consider the frequency and intensity that feels right for your fitness level. Frequency is how often you exercise, and intensity is how hard you run. For example, beginners may benefit from a walk/run program that can also incorporate jogging into their training program. In addition, it’s vital to build cross-training into your schedule. For example, you can always work on strength training and conditioning on days you’re not running. 

Injury Prevention

New runners unfortunately tend to get injured more easily, and we see a lot of preventable running injuries in the clinic. So, injury prevention is crucial to a successful running career. One straightforward injury prevention technique is to start slow. Increase your weekly distance slowly because pushing yourself too hard could quickly end your running journey. Likewise, listen to your body. If aches and pains hinder progress, it’s okay to return to your previous mileage. In addition, repetition can lead to injury, so strive for variety in your training. For example, change up your daily distance or run on various surfaces. Make sure that you include another form of exercise in your weekly exercise regimens, such as yoga, biking, swimming, or strength training. Running is a great exercise, but only using running as exercise can increase your risk of injury.

Importance of Individualization 

No two runners are the same. What works for one person may not work for you. If you decide to use a pre-designed running program, you can modify the plan to fit your needs. If you’re wondering how to start running, we suggest creating an individualized program tailored to your specific goals and needs. 

The COR Running Program offers a personalized consultation with a physical therapist to put you on the path to success. Our unique biomechanical analysis process gives invaluable insight into your gait and cadence. Running is a fun way to exercise and stay healthy. So, we’d love to help you get started on your running journey. Schedule a consultation online today

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